Blog: 25th Anniversary of Untied Plant Savers 2019

 

 

 

 

Plant saving, plant preservation for future generations are just two of the goals for United Plant Savers. Those of us in the herbal field rely on their up to date ‘at risk’ and ‘to watch’ plant list. Rosemary Gladstar and other concerned herbalists created an organization that was/is deeply concerned about the depletion of our plant populations. They began twenty -five years ago, in 1994, when herbalism experienced a resurgence. Many wild plants hit the airwaves like St John’s Wort and others creating intense demand. These grass root herbalists took their concerns, created UpS, United Plant Savers, and put those concerns into action.

In Rutland Ohio, the first UpS sponsored botanical sanctuary was born where species like American Ginseng, Goldenseal and others are propagated and replanted all over the country. Today many sanctuaries exist all over our country including personal backyards all the way to well known botanical gardens, all striving to propagate, educate their communities on the importance of respecting and using plants with mindfulness to species needs.

UpS also offers the opportunity to apply for grant money to fund your community project. It worked for me. Two years ago, with the grant money awarded to the  Garden Path Garden Club in Tolland CT, we created the Turtle Teaching Circle. With parents help and students, a 20′ diameter circle was placed near the children’s garden with 12 stumps marking the places on a typical native American Wheel. Each place on the wheel has a trail quality sign featuring an ‘at-risk’ or ‘to-watch’ plant native to New England. The project is near a community trail with easy handicap access. Students are taught about gardening and seed saving.

We still see a decrease in plant populations due to popularity. I have been to the sanctuary in Rutland Ohio. Meadows and woodlands, forest and trails highlight the diverse habitats needed to preserve ‘at-risk- plants and more. They offer classes in herbalism with experts guiding foraging experiences that are respectful of habitat, plant-specific needs, and place in complex ecosystems. Sustainable regenerative gardening practices are key to the survival of our plants.

I hope you will go to their website and explore their articles, their resources and maybe get to one of their events. They will be honored and highlighted at this year’s International Herb Symposium in MA. If you use herbal supplements and garden, add another herb to your planting list this year to conserve our plant resources. If you use herbal supplements and don’t garden, please consider a donation to UpS.

I have been a member off and on for these past 25 years. We are activists, environmentalists, herbalists, folks who simply care about this earth and her resources, each in his or her own way. Check them out. This is a fantastic time for the organization, a time of honoring the work done and where and how we need to focus today on our journey, our partnership with the earth.

Enjoy. Judith

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Mark Shepard, Founder of Restoration Agriculture Development

Description: This is exciting! Folks out there are working diligently every day to protect, build and maintain viable healthy ecosystems and produce food. Meet Mark Shepard who founded Restoration Agriculture Development, RAD, in order to save viable ecosystems while growing nutrient-rich food. His approach with his team is to imitate the structure and function of the specific ecosystem’s natural plant communities while utilizing the appropriate agroforestry and water management techniques to produce an agricultural yield. While restoring carbon sequestration, water purification, and infiltration, nutrient cycling occurs while supporting, maintaining and preserving biodiversity. Individually, taking steps to support biodiversity, adds up to big results. I am excited to learn more about how company’s like Mark’s educate and support better agriculture development and maintain various ecosystems we desperately need today.  This is hopeful, positive progress. Please share!

About My guest: Mark Shepard with RAD: Restoration Agricultural Development:
RAD is a full-service environmental consulting, research, and development firm committed to developing agricultural ecosystems that provide nutritious food for humankind while enhancing the life-supporting ecosystem services of planet Earth. Mark Shepard has over 30 years of experience in environmental consulting, production agriculture, and real estate development. Together, RAD has worked on 100+ projects in multiple climates across 4 continents. Through active ecosystem management, RAD combines ecological restoration with agricultural development to improve your landscape.

Transcript:  #46 Mark Shepard (1)

It’s all About Thyme: 2 Easy Recipes

 

 

My podcast guest this week, Joan Palmer, founder of The Institute of Sustainable Nutrition, or TIOSN, reminded me how important it is to use the food we grow in our kitchens. Seems like a no-brainer, right? But, we get busy with work, household chores, children’s schedules, all can claim our time. Plants too, have their own agendas, ones they follow regardless of our attention or inattention. They have a schedule of peak growth and then they wane. If our attention is elsewhere, we lose harvest time.

So I thought, let me share 2 easy recipes for using garden thyme in particular and other culinary herbs you may have dried or stored,

Food Alert: many herbs can be irradiated as they come into our country. 

“The USA has the most advanced commercial food irradiation program in the
world and the volume of irradiated food consumed in the US is second only
to China. Information on the current status of irradiation in the USA can be
obtained at www.foodirradiation.org or from the Food Irradiation Update
Newsletter published by the author.
A significant amount of the international trade in irradiated food has been
driven by consumer acceptance of irradiated food in the US and access to
that large and lucrative market. More than ten countries currently export
produce to US retailers.
Food products irradiated or marketed in the US during 2015 included
approximately 68 000 tons of spices, 30 000 tons of fruits and vegetables, and
an estimated 12 500 tons of meat, poultry, and live oysters.” ( from foodiradiation.org)

Herbs de Provence is a traditional herb mix often used in European cooking. Drying culinary herbs gives us an opportunity to create flavorful mixtures as fall and winter approach. As Joan states in the podcast, “use real food.” Food from our gardens is not irradiated, hopefully organic. We know the source, we grow it locally, we eat what we grow by our own hands.

So here are 2 Easy Recipes you can easily make. If you don’t have the herbs mentioned I hope you will buy organic.

Recipe: Herbes de Provence: 

Ingredients:

  • 3 Tablespoons dried marjoram
  • 3 Tablespoons dried thyme
  • 3 Tablespoons dried savory
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried sage
  • 1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds

Preparation:

Combine marjoram, thyme, savory, basilrosemary, sage, and fennel. Mix well and spoon into a tightly-lidded jar. Store in a cool, dark place up to 4 months. Add to soups, stews, roasts, fish etc all to your tastes.

Here’s a recipe using Herbs de Provence:


Chicken with Herbes de Provence Recipe

Recipe Type: Poultry, Chicken
Yields: 4 servings
Prep time: 10 min
Cook time: 30 min
Ingredients:

4 chicken boneless breast halves (with skin)*
3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon herbes de Provence**

* Do not remove skin until after baking, as the skin helps to retain moisture in the meat.

Preparation:

Place chicken breasts, single layer, into an ungreased 13×9-inch baking dish.

In a medium-sized bowl, combine olive oil and the herbes de Provence together. Pour marinade over chicken breasts. Cover and marinate at room temperature for 20 minutes or refrigerate to marinate longer (turning meat over several times).

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Bake, uncovered, 25 to 30 minutes or until a meat thermometer registers an internal temperature of 165 degrees F (juices will run clear when cut with the tip of a knife); basting several times during cooking. Remove from oven and serve immediately.

Have fun trying a new recipe. Do you have any favorites using thyme? All comments are appreciated.

Bon Appetit! Judith

 

 

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Joan Palmer, Founder TIOSN

Description: The Institute of Sustainable Nutrition, TIOSN, offers a one-year certification program in Sustainable Health and Nutrition. They have four focuses: 
1. Learn and practice sustainable gardening methods.
2. Take the food from the garden, weeds included, and grow your culinary skills in the kitchen.
3. Identify nutrient-rich wild plants, for culinary and medicinal uses both for us and the garden.
4. Learn about preparing wild edibles for food and medicine.

Joan Palmer, the founder of TIOSN, shares her experiences, and how she is attempting to connect the dots between our health, the health of the planet, through the science and art of gardening and nutrition.

About My Guest: Joan Palmer is the Founder and Director of The Institute of Sustainable Nutrition and owner of Real Food Matters, LLC. Joan has an MS in Human Nutrition, a BS in Education and received her certification as a Family/Community Herbalist. She has been planting the seeds of real food matters for decades through educational programs presented to schools, businesses, organizations, families, and individuals. Joan presents the Art and Science of Eating as part of an accredited master’s degree program in Ct.

Transcript:  Joan Palmer #45 

Blog: All About Seeds: 3 Tips for Saving, Germinating and Planting

 

 

The vegetable life does not content itself with casting from the flower or the tree a single seed, but it fills the air and earth with a prodigality of seeds, that, if thousands perish, thousands may plant themselves, that hundreds may come up, that tens may live to maturity; that, at least one may replace the parent. Ralph Waldo Emerson

Seeds, amazing structures, some tiny, barely the size of the head of a pin, some large like the sunflower or a bean, that produce an almost infinite variety of plants, delight and nourish us. When January comes along so do the seed catalogs. We have the time and the energy to pour over endless possibilities. Never boring, we drool over page after page of color and form all in preparation for that spring garden. Seeds, tiny and large have the potential of infinitely so much more. I wonder how we can doubt that the universe is abundant beyond measure?

Here’s a couple of basic seed facts, good reminders for the upcoming growing season.

1. Seeds develop in the ovary of a flower, most from flowering plants and some from non-flowering plants.
2. It is a miniature plant with a protective cover in a suspended state of development
3. Inside each seed is the genetic information for future growth, a food supply, called endosperm that can be made up of proteins, carbohydrates or fats. Considered nutrition, this food store supplies the world’s major foods e.g. cereals, wheat, and rice.

Seeds are precious. Together with healthy soil, good water, and air they feed us, nourish us, delight our senses in so many ways. Yet, we have manipulated them, doused them and injected them with substances not natural to their very existence. I hope you will continue to buy heirloom, organic varieties of seeds. When we support the companies that offer us these invaluable choices we cast a vote. We make a difference, one choice at a time.

Seed Starting Tips*
1. Get your timing right for seeds chosen.
2. Buy fresh seed. Remember seed is alive.
3. Inoculating seeds is one of the best ways to encourage healthy production. “Inoculation may be defined as the process of adding effective bacteria to the host plant seed before planting. The purpose of inoculation is to make sure that there is enough of the correct type of bacteria present in the soil so that a successful legume-bacterial symbiosis is established.”
4. Use seed-starting mix or germination mix.
5. Cleanliness counts: when reusing flats, trays, cells or pots wash with a dilute bleach solution: 1:10 bleach to water; soapy water can also be used.
6. Pre-moisten mix before using but do not leave soggy.

Seed Germination Tips
1. Bottom heat is recommended and a dome or plastic lid or plastic wrap can create a germination chamber too; looking for 70 degrees.
2. Once plants have emerged, take off the lid and shut off heat.
3. Don’t let seeds dry out before they germinate: let the soil go slightly dry between watering.
4. Water new seedlings lightly. Heavy hose sprays can damage tender growth.
5. Seedlings need lots of light; Take outside by day and bring in by night till time for planting

Seed Planting Tips
1. Harden off seeds first: place outside during day 1-3 hours in a sheltered location. Do this over 7-10 days. Protect from strong sun, wind, and cool temperatures.
2. Chose the strongest and healthiest looking seedlings to plant in the garden. Weak or smaller than average can yield poor results.
3. Plan for succession sowings. Sow a short row every couple of weeks to avoid large servings of lettuce in a single day’s harvest.

We forget our holistic relationship to the world around us, a partnership is a dynamic, thriving one. While the above offers practical advice let us not forget about our connection to all that is around us. It is my deepest hope to kindle within you a reverence again for nature and that includes seeds.

“In every seed lie the components of all life the world has known from all time to now.” 
—Sister Joan Chittister
from “Seeds of a New Humanity”

* Disclaimer: I participate in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for me to earn small fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliate sites. Thank you so much for supporting these efforts to pass on worthwhile and invaluable resources. And as I said before I love books and high-quality garden supplies. It’s a pleasure to share with you my favorites.  Enjoy. Judith

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us with Agneta Borstein, Professional Astrologer: Highlights for 2019

Description: 2019 is here. We enter into a new vibration:  2+0+1+9 = 3 year. For those of you who appreciate the art and the science of Astrology, I have a treat for you. Agneta Borstein returns to Holistic Nature of Us, with her opinions and expertise about the energy, the feeling for 2019. And as a great treat and honor, she runs down all our sun signs and gives us practical advice. Jam-packed with guidance and takeaways I hope you enjoy this New Year’s Day treat. She gives us food for thought for creating our vision boards for 2019, too, all providing inspiration to kick off 2019.  

About My Guest: Agneta Borstein, is a professional astrologer, workshop facilitator, teacher, author, and shamanic practitioner who combines her thirty years of healing with a distinct and personal approach. Born in Sweden, Agneta incorporated her BA in business with metaphysics and operated an alternative bookstore for twenty-one years. She maintains her private practices in West Hartford and Avon, CT, has spoken at numerous conferences, is the current president of the Astrological Society of CT, Inc., she is the Producer and host of the astrological Nutmeg TV show “From the Sky to Earth”, and is the author of The Moon’s Nodes, Understanding the Dynamic Ties that Bind.

Transcript: Podcast #44 Agneta Borstein

Podcast: Craig StandingBear, Stories and the Winter Solstice

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Description: Winter solstice is upon us. Our seasonal wheel turns once again into a new season marked by the path of the sun and the moon. It is said that Grandfather Sun starts his return to Grandmother Moon on the Winter Solstice.

I am honored to have Craig Standing Bear, Storyteller, flute player, moccasin maker tell a story for our Winter time. Winter, in indigenous tribal life here in America, was a time to fix and mend, a time for stories. The Storyteller was valued and held a place of esteem. After all, he had the news, the gossip, and the tales to pass along from one tribe to the next. On the Winter solstice, we end autumn and gives thanks for her blessings. As our wheel turns to winter, enjoy an original story told by Craig honoring winter. The podcast is enhanced with original flute songs by Craig from his CD, Reflections. Contact Craig directly to purchase his CD: www.mohawkleathers.com

About My Guest: Craig StandingBear is Mowak, Scottish and French Canadian. He has much experience telling stories for schools, libraries and other venues following his Native American tradition.  He plays the flute, makes moccasins and other leather goods. He can be found at Powwows here in New England, go to wandering bull website for 2019 powwow schedule. 

Transcripts:  #43 Craig Standing Bear

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Lisa Barrett, Counselor and Art Therapist

Description: All living organisms thrive/survive on two measurable wavelengths: audio and light. Each color has its own measurable wavelength with its own frequency and vibrational intensity. Color has a physiological response 24/7 in our bodies. We are activated by color and we can be calmed by color. Join Lisa and I as we explore how color affects us and how art therapy provides a valid and worthwhile dimension to a therapeutic practice.

About My Guest: Lisa Barrett is a Licensed Practicing Counselor and a Registered Art Therapist.  She has an extensive background within diverse clinical settings which include residential treatment facilities as a Director for Adjunctive Therapies and in a short psychiatric hospital as a primary therapist for children and adolescents.  Lisa practices in two different locations: East Windsor and South Windsor with her primary practice in East Windsor, CT. Lisa works with children as young as 5 years through adulthood and she specializes in trauma, grief, autism, depression, anxiety and dual diagnosis.

Transcript:  #42 Lisa Barrett

Blog: Goal Setting From the Heart: What Are You Wishing For?

The end of the year approaches. Family and friends gather, we have some time off. What are your thoughts and dreams for 2019? Vision boards help us manifest that which we are wanting. With purposeful action and goal setting our dreams can come true. What’s your favorite goal setting tool?

Following our dreams brings us into our heart space, our soul. What is your passion? Do you have the courage to follow that inner prompting, take steps to bring those dreams into the world? Not always easy, yet fulfilling in unimaginable ways. And we have so many great and fun tools to assist in this journey. My guest this week, Deb Sodergren, encourages us to sit mindfully with our goals, aims, desires and create an action plan. Taking thoughtful steps, accepting disciplined effort all help your dream manifest. To have a dream come true is simply awesome!

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Ohotto’s book, Transforming Fate into Destiny, is a must for the journey and for understanding the difference between fate and destiny. Do you let life control you? Or do you follow a deep sense of knowing that which makes your heart sing? Not easy questions but Robert’s insightful expertise helps us understand the difference between fate and destiny. Understanding that which we want to create, taking appropriate steps to manifest those dreams can take us to unexpected places so we can live our destined life. Consider looking at your life differently.

Last, but not least, here’s a day planner for the year with prompts and inspiration. Have fun with it.

Disclaimer:  I participate in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for me to earn small ( as in teeny) fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliate sites. Thank you so much for supporting these efforts to pass on worthwhile and invaluable resources. And as I said before I love books. It’s a pleasure to share with you my favorites, books and other ideas especially for the gift-giving time of year. Enjoy. Judith

 

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Deb Sodergren

Description: Enjoy Deb Sodergren’s return to Holistic Nature of Us as we prepare for the holidays. Author and speaker, Deb shares her wisdom and experience offering tips and suggestions for de-stressing during this busy time of year. Mindfulness, including nature walks, getting out into the fresh air and being grateful keep us centered and grounded as we enjoy family and friends. Join us for a delightful discussion with many practical tips that encourage us to embrace the holidays, family and friends, with love and joy.

About My guest: Deb Sodergren is an Energy Body Vibration Expert/International Speaker/Author and owner of Up Vibrations, LLC. She graduated from the New England School of Metaphysics in 1998, and nationally certified as a Reiki Master Teacher and certified to teach Metaphysics and Meditation. She is also an Infinite Possibilities Certified Trainer.
“My philosophy of healing is based on taking care of my clients with alternative healing modalities and sometimes with traditional allopathic medicine to ensure that the individual’s whole self is being maintained and balanced. I bring to my practice a deep understanding of the human energy field and the body, mind, and spirit connection as well as extensive training in the areas of Reiki, meditation, chakra balancing, vibrational medicine, channeling, death & dying, infinite possibilities mindset and others.”

Transcript:  #41 Deb Sodergren

 

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