Podcast: Meet Rachel Sayet, Tribal Member Mohegan Sun

Description: Rachel Sayet, walks her talk as she travels around our country teaching and sharing Native American traditional cooking and culture. She is a member of the Mohegan Tribe here in SW CT and a chef with a background in restaurant management and a Masters Degree in Anthropology. Her teaching experiences are varied as she hopes to bring back more traditional foods along with their rich history of storytelling, music, and calendars. She supports the US Food Sovereignty Alliance and the Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance. Her enthusiasm and energy are inspiring.

About My Guest: Rachel is a Mohegan tribal member from Uncasville, Connecticut. She received her bachelor’s degree in restaurant management from Cornell University. While attending Cornell, Rachel worked in kitchens and took many culinary classes. Upon graduation, Rachel worked as a personal chef in upstate New York. She later went on to receive her master’s in anthropology at Harvard University. Rachel has been working for the Mohegan Cultural Department since 2013. Since then, she has also been researching Native American foods. She has presented her work throughout the country at conferences and classrooms, and has begun food sovereignty initiatives at the Mohegan Tribe; partnering with the health department on gardening events, cooking and storytelling workshops for Mohegan youth, and a native cooking show. Her most recent project is the Native Food Discussion Group, created in order to share knowledge about seasonal eating, harvesting, growing, and fishing practices.

Transcript: #22 Rachel Sayet 

 

Blog: Canticle Farms Community Vision

 

 

 

I am inspired by on the ground, in the dirt, devotion, dedication, and innovation directed towards creating a more collaborative world. And so much is happening as we see and witness one idea, coupled with practical action, take root all around our globe making a difference. Folks, including children, are taking chances, making products, developing innovations that have immediate positive consequences. Isn’t it great?

Father Rohr, the founder of the Center for Action and Contemplation(CAC) in New Mexico, says change happens from the bottom up not the top down.  We know we have problems. We know we not been good stewards of this planet. We know that our conquer and control mentality only feeds the bottom corporate line and fills us with stuff. But many of us, you and I, want something better. We want healthy vibrant seeds free of chemicals and returned to us. We want fresh healthy food grown in healthy vibrant soils. We want our air and water to be clean and pure. We want to feel the vibrancy of nature not just for us but for the next generations. We want a safe world, filled with wonder, beauty. What is our legacy? What will we leave behind? Important questions that I hope inspires you in some way to take action.

My podcast series, Holistic Nature of Us, has enabled me to speak with folks across our country, including Anne Symens-Bucher of Canticle Farms. Canticle Farms is a living, breathing, holistic-based community near troubled areas in East Oakland Cal. She mentioned Johanna Macy, an author who reminds us we are in a time called “the great turning”. She speaks of growing community where everyone: land, species, people, housing, neighbors are respected, valued. The youtube above is short yet timely. We can take down fences, get to know our neighbors again, reach out and help each other today.

Holistic, sustainable, reverent appreciation for all creates a more fulfilling world.

Albert Schweitzer said: ” By having a reverence for life, we enter into a spiritual relation with the world. By practicing reverence for life we become good, deep, and alive.”

Any thoughts, or comments?  I enjoy hearing from you.  You are valued and appreciated. Enjoy. Judith

 

 

Podcast: Meet Anne Symens-Bucher, Canticle Farm, East Oakland, CA

Description: I came across Canticle Farm through Father Richard Rohr’s work at his Center for Action and Contemplation in New Mexico. Intrigued I contacted Canticle Farm and met Anne Symens-Bucher, an initiatory member. Canticle Farm is a community begun one step at a time in an urban neighborhood in East Oakland, CA experimenting at the intersection of faith-based, social justice-based and earth-based non-violent activism. They take a holistic approach to community in all its facets and complexity. Join us for a deep and inspiring discussion. All comments are appreciated. Please like and share. Thanks.

About My Guest: Anne Symens-Bucher is an initiatory member fo Canticle Farm, a community in East Oakland, CA experimenting at the intersection of faith-based, social justice-based, and earth-based non-violent activism.

Transcript:: #21 Ann Symens-Bucher

 

Blog: The Rights of Nature

 

Powerful, moving discussion on giving nature rights too. Historically, in modern society, we see nature as an object and in law, as property. The very laws we have created creates destruction, We have an unprecedented biodiversity crisis. This speaker says: “we have a right to life when that which gives us life doesn’t have a corresponding right to life.” She makes a beautiful and articulate case that when we activate the codes of love and compassion with all beings, we all flourish.

My guest this week, Pam Montgomery, offers classes and experiences to connect with a single plant. The results are life changing and I bet game-changing for some.  She too reminds us that we are dependent on the very things that sustain us, food, plants, animals, minerals, the stuff of this earth. Father Rohr reminds us that change happens from the bottom up not the top down.

There are many ideas bearing fruit in our world today that help mitigates the problems we have created: pollution of water, soil, and air. I have the privilege this year of speaking with so many passionate people walking their talk, especially in the plant world. This TED talk, adds more to the plea, to realize we need nature and nature needs us, today.

What one action can you make today to make a difference? Here are a few suggestions, with links to some of my favorite organizations.

  1. Support United Plant Savers, especially if you use herbal medicine. A donation helps them preserve plant species, support botanical sanctuaries all over our country.
  2. Support O.N.E.: its time to value nature again.
  3. Look at your yard differently. Replace lawn, even a small space area with wildflowers, improves biodiversity not just for your space but for your neighborhood.
  4. If you live in an urban area: look around. What land is fallow and could be turned into gardens or a wildflower meadow?
  5. Lastly, though there is so much more, walk out your door today and breathe the fresh air and give thanks.

What are your favorite organizations? What one change can you make today that supports sustainability in a positive way? Together, one idea at a time, joining our neighborhoods together in some sustainable way, makes a huge difference. I want to be a part of the solutions, don’t you?

I appreciate your ideas and comments. Please share. Thanks. Judith

 

 

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Pam Montgomery, Founding Member of O.N.E.

Description: Meet Pam Montgomery, author, teacher, and practitioner who works with plants and investigates plants/trees and their intelligent spiritual nature for more than three decades. She is a founding member of United Plant Savers and more recently the Organization of Nature Evolutionaries, O.N.E. She and others strive to connect the heart of nature with the heart of humanity. Join us for an engaging and enlightening discussion. All comments are appreciated. Please like and share. Thanks!

About My guest: Pam Montgomery is an author, teacher, and practitioner who has passionately embraced her role as a spokesperson for the green beings and has been investigating plants/trees and their intelligent spiritual nature for more than three decades. She is the author of two books one of which is the highly acclaimed Plant Spirit Healing; A Guide to Working with Plant Consciousness and Partner Earth; A Spiritual Ecology. She operates the Partner Earth Education Center at Sweetwater Sanctuary in Danby, Vermont where classes, plant research, and ceremonies take place. Pam also teaches internationally on plant spirit healing, spiritual ecology and people as Nature Evolutionaries. She is a founding member of United Plant Savers and more recently the Organization of Nature Evolutionaries or O.N.E. Her latest passion is to engage ceremonially in full symbiosis within the plant/human matrix where the elder common plants and trees initiate and guide us into being truly human.

Transcript: #20 Pam Montgomery

Blog: The Power of Choice

 

This is a tough subject. Most of us enjoy the all -American breakfast of eggs and bacon, especially on the weekend. It’s a staple of family cooking and shopping. Foodies create dishes using bacon with more flair such as bacon bowls, goat cheese wrapped in bacon, pasta primavera with bacon. Then, there’s bacon jam and soup too.

Our taste buds love fat and salt so bacon has the perfect combination. Once thought of as a comfort food in lean times, bacon has taken center stage in foodie cooking, advertising. So, sales have risen. What are the implications for more pig products? The above video addresses a problem we mentioned in this week’s podcast with my guest Ellen Moyer.

We briefly addressed the power of choice too, how one choice such as “I want bacon with my eggs” leads us to all the implications needed to bring that choice home to our table. When we buy bacon at the supermarket we cast a vote. Increased need means we need more pigs. How are they taken care of? More pigs mean more poo and when manure is so concentrated it becomes a problem of where to put it. And if antibiotics and steroids, hormones are used en masse, these substances get into our soil, water, and air. Pig poo, in particular, is a major problem in certain areas. As the above video shows, neighborhoods are coated with the fine spray and the smell. It’s on everything. In Iowa and Minnesota, concentrated pig poo creates a foam and then that explodes, killing pigs.

The Modern Farmer states: “The University of Minnesota reported that in September of 2011, a half a dozen flash-fires related to pig manure sprung up in the UpperMidwest. The worst of the string killed 1,500 pigs and left one worker with severe burns.”

congerdesign / Pixabay

Our food system is complex. We rely on convenience in our supermarkets, so what we purchase creates a demand. Every purchase casts a vote and the implications are huge. Ellen and others suggest, reducing meat consumption by one meal per week. Let’s look at 4 implications of choosing organic meat:

  1. Organic manure supports healthy soil management, healthy soils produce healthy nutrient-rich foods.
  2. Decreases the amount of pesticides and synthetic fertilizers/neurotoxins that seep into our soil, water, and air.
  3. Rainforests are often cleared for grazing. Our choices can decrease this practice and restore a more positive ecosystem.
  4. Our pocketbooks: decreasing our meat consumption by one meal /week saves us money.

Lastly, remember we vote with our dollars. Choose wisely.

What is your reaction to the above video? Send us your stories/comments. Please like and share. Thanks.

Judith

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Ellen Moyer: To Help or Harm?

Podcast: Meet Ellen Moyer, author, TED talk presenter, who talks about her new book, Our Earth, Our Species, Our Selves: How to THRIVE While Creating a Sustainable World. I invited Ellen back to discuss the socio-economic implications of sustainability or not. What are the costs of eating meat and the long-term implications for our planet? What happens on pig farms that destroys property values in some states? Ellen offers intriguing insights on the short and long-term implications of some of the choices we make today specifically with regards to our food system. Ellen’s vast experience creating green environments offers all of us great creative solutions which we can act upon today. Some simple, some inspiring. And please comment, share and like. Thanks!

About my guest: Environmental engineer Ellen Moyer, Ph.D., wrote this book, her third, to empower and inspire readers to accelerate our urgently needed global transformation. She has more than three decades of experience in assessing and cleaning up contaminated soil and groundwater and designing “green” systems and solutions. Moyer holds a BA in anthropology, an MS in environmental engineering, and a Ph.D. in civil engineering. She is a registered professional engineer, a US Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional, and a regular contributor to The Huffington Post. www.ellenmoyerphd.com.

Transcript: #19 Ellen Moyer

Blog: Planting by the Moon

 

 

Planting by the Moon? Romantic, Scientific? A Folk Tale?

It seems it’s all of the above and more. The Old Farmers Almanac gave gardening advice based on the moon phases for each month and region. They continue to do so. They relate many tales of local gardeners relying on the moon phases who grew larger turnips and harvested an abundance of beans. Yet has science caught up to the folklore? Some sources, such as the Rudolph Steiner biodynamic method, follow moon phases and claim abundant results.

The idea is the full moon correlates to gravitational pull upward. Tissues swell, growth expands upward. By the same principle, after the new moon occurs, planting bulbs, perennials, roots seems to produce a positive outcome too. Some scientists will give the gravitational pull effect a nod and others will consider the lunar gravitational pull as something to objectify.

Ute York, in her book “Living by the Moon”, says:

“The old-time gardeners say, “With the waxing of the moon, the earth exhales. ” When the sap in the plants rises, the force first goes into the growth above ground. Thus, you should do all activities with plants that bear fruit above ground during a waxing moon. With the waning of the moon, the earth inhales. Then, the sap primarily goes down toward the roots. Thus, the waning moon is a good time for pruning, multiplying, fertilizing, watering, harvesting, and controlling parasites and weeds” 

We know trees inhale and exhale but the earth too? Does it matter? We’ve been planting for eons. Some get it right, maybe have “green thumbs”, some of us are not so good at gardening. Biodynamic farming communities seem to thrive, combining good soil practices with moon phase, astrological understanding. My podcast guest this week, Agneta Borstein, professional astrologer, teacher and Shamanic practitioner would agree. A native of Sweeden, now living here in CT, plants by the moon and wouldn’t do it any other way.

My grandfather was an immigrant. He came here from Lithuania in the early 1900’s. He had a  green thumb and though I don’t know for sure I suspect he planted by the moon. Older cultures seem to know this, have this wisdom.

Goumbik / Pixabay

Do you or your family plant by the phases of the moon? What wisdom did you learn from older family members? If yes, I would enjoy your stories. Send us a comment. Please like and share. Thanks, and enjoy.

Judith

Podcast: Talking to the Stars: Agneta Borstein, Astrologer

Description: Today’s podcast approaches holism from a different perspective, namely astrology. Astrology is embedded in our human experience. If we follow Astrology’s history in our development as a species, we see that every time and place has found its own way of “talking with the planets.” Meet Agneta Borstein, professional astrologer, teacher and shamanic practitioner who takes on a journey with Taurus, the moon, and eclipses and relates it to our everyday life connecting the dots to our holistic nature.

About My Guest: Agneta Borstein, is a professional astrologer, workshop facilitator, teacher, author, and shamanic practitioner who combines her thirty years of healing with a distinct and personal approach. Born in Sweden, Agneta incorporated her BA in business with metaphysics and operated an alternative bookstore for twenty-one years. She maintains her private practices in West Hartford and Avon, CT, has spoken at numerous conferences, is the current president of the Astrological Society of CT, Inc. She is the Producer and host of the astrological Nutmeg TV show “From the Sky to Earth”, and is the author of The Moon’s Nodes, Understanding the Dynamic Ties that Bind.

Transcript: Transcript Agneta Borstein

Blog: Ocean Sound Pollution Affecting Our Friends

 

The ocean world is dependent on sound more so than vision. Sound travels differently in a watery medium. It moves faster and can travel longer. Water can bend sound waves too, diverting a straight line into a zigzag type of path. What is our noise, from boats, oil rigs, deep water testing, and sonar, doing to our friends who live in the sea?

A lot.

My guest this week, Dr. Leesa Sklover, ocean activist, musician, and composer, says that whales, dolphins, shrimp, turtles, and zooplankton cannot escape harm from these practices. It’s disorienting, and if a whale cannot hear it’s basically dead. Disorientation causes stress chemicals and hormones to increase which has the potential to enter our food supply. She inspired me through her writing, her songs and passion to share with you the seriously detrimental effects noise pollution has on our ocean friends.

“The speed of sound in pure water is 1,498 meters per second, compared to 343 meters per second in air at room temperature and pressure.” Sound travels faster in the ocean because there are more molecules — specifically salt molecules — for waves to interact with, as well as higher surface temperatures.”(Sciencing)

Noise pollution has increased dramatically over the years. Increased shipping, advanced military sonic testing technologies, commercial boats, huge liners all contribute to noise pollution. Echolocation, finding prey becomes harder. Populations are diminishing, not only whales, dolphins, and other sea life but food for the larger species is scarce too. Factor in the inability to hear the click of a salmon due to noise pollution and we are finding whales who are malnourished and some cannot bring a fetus to full term

Legislation is against them too. The Cetacean Society states:

ACTION NEEDED: The newly released Presidential FY 2019 budget has taken direct aim at programs that are critical for the conservation of whales and dolphins. The Marine Mammal Commission (MMC), an independent government agency that provides science-based reviews of U.S. ocean policies that impact marine mammals and their environment, has been targeted for elimination. The cost of the MMC’s work to the US taxpayer? One penny per person per year.

The budget also looks to cut overall funding to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) by 14 percent. Even worse, the NMFS enforcement budget would be slashed by 25 percent putting cetaceans at risk from a variety of illegal activities. There are also serious cuts proposed to critical research on protected species, and habitat conservation and restoration.

If holism means the whole is only as strong as its parts, what’s happening in the oceans affects us. Ocean species are suffering and what are we doing to protect them? Do we have some responsibility to them as part of this world? Are we at a tipping point and seduced in thinking all is okay?

My Native elders would point to nature over and over again as precious, invaluable to life, and in a sense, nature’s operating system mirrors ours. If one part is dying, are we dying? In Earth Calling, by Ellen Gunter and Ted Carter, we are poked and prodded with facts to look around and feel something for the destruction going on and take action. Many of us enjoy these creatures from the sea. But are we doing enough to protect them from harm?

Enjoy Dr. Sklover’s song: See Me As I Am:  

What are you doing? I enjoy hearing your comments/your stories. Please share. Thanks.

Judith

 

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