Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Joshua’s Trust: Benefits of Land Preservation

Description: My guests this week, Paul Pribula and Julia Rogers, members and volunteers with Joshua Tract Conservation and Historic Trust here in Eastern Connecticut share the geographic developments and benefits of land trusts preserving woodlands, watersheds, and more for future generations. Joshua’s Trust is the largest in Connecticut, protecting over 4000 acres within fourteen towns.

“Generous landowners who donate conservation easements to Joshua’s Land Trust are inspired by many things: they love Eastern Connecticut, they feel connected to their land, and they wish to leave a legacy of protected land for future generations. This inspiration is at the heart of our work to permanently protect valuable natural resources here in northeastern Connecticut.”

About My Guests: Paul Pribula is a re-tread music educator (band and orchestra), application systems programmer/analyst/designer, and recently retired as a senior project manager and VP at RBS Citizens. Subsequent to moving to Connecticut from the south side of Chicago, Paul became an avid hiker, backpacker, whitewater kayaker and snowshoer, which led to a great respect and need for the forests and rivers, which in turn led to a 15 year stint with the Willington Conservation Commission and an associated interest and developed skill set in GIS mapping technology. He is now GIS mapping team lead, Board of Trustees member and VP at Joshua’s Trust, a Land Trust Alliance accredited land trust dedicated to preserving natural landscape through collaborations with landowners and our communities.

Julia Rogers is a master’s degree candidate at the University of Connecticut, and a volunteer at Joshua’s Trust. At the Trust, much of her work is focused on using geographic information systems (GIS) to enhance the regional planning capability of the Trust. She also works with interns from UConn to update trail maps and management plan maps. Julia is currently a member of the Mansfield Conservation Commission, and a high-value volunteer for Joshua’s Trust, assisting with GIS mapping and training, UConn intern coordination and supervision, and is currently drafting our 5-year Strategic Land Conservation Plan document.

Transcript:  #15 Julia Rogers

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Land Trusts



My guests this week, Paul Pribula and Julia Rogers, members and volunteers with Joshua Tract Conservation and Historic Trust here in Eastern Connecticut share the geographic developments and benefits of land trusts preserving woodlands, watersheds, and more for future generations. Joshua’s Trust is the largest in Connecticut, protecting over 4000 acres over fourteen towns.

Generous landowners who donate conservation easements to Joshua’s Land Trust are inspired by many things: they love Eastern Connecticut, they feel connected to their land, and they wish to leave a legacy of protected land for future generations. This inspiration is at the heart of our work to permanently protect valuable natural resources here in northeastern Connecticut.”

Check out this episode!

Blog: Music From the Plants: Honoring Meditation Garden Day

 

 

 

Can you heart the plants sing? We hear sounds from the meadows and forests with the movement of air. But, did you know that plants make their own music too?

 

 

 

 

“Since the 1970s, Damanhur—a Federation of Communities with its own constitution, culture, art, music, currency, school and uses of science and technology (www.damanhur.org)—has researched communication with the plant world. As part of this research, they created an instrument able to perceive the electromagnetic variations from the surface of plant leaves to the root system and translated them into sound.” Pretty cool, right. Extensive research is ongoing as we develop more and more sensitive equipment to help us hear, interact, understand the complexity of the plant world. If we believe we are one, then we are connected to everything. These tools give us another way to connect with and respect the plant world, to cohabit with them.

My guest this week, Jen Frey, does just that. She mentions Damanhur community, the type of equipment needed and brings this awareness to many events.

Since May 3rd Is Garden Meditation Day I thought I would include a plant song, Red Roses, for you to use for your meditation today. Red Roses, long the symbol of love shares her beautiful music. Remember all comments, and shares are appreciated. Enjoy. Judith

 

Holistic Nature of Us: Jen Frey and Music From the Plants



Did you know we can hear the plants sing? Science and technology have advanced so we can capture a plant’s vibrations and translate it into music. As a healer, mentor, earth advocate, and voice of the plants my guest, Jen Frey, does just that. Their music stirs us to fall in love again with this mysterious realm. And, at the end of this interview, Jen offers us a treat: we hear music from red roses. 

Check out this episode!

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Jen Frey: Music From the PLants

Description: Did you know we can hear the plants sing? Science and technology have advanced so we can capture a plant’s vibrations and translate it into music. As a healer, mentor, earth advocate, and voice of the plants my guest, Jen Frey, does just that. Their music stirs us to fall in love again with this mysterious realm. And, at the end of this interview, Jen offers us a treat: we hear music from red roses.

About my Guest: Jen Frey is a Healer, Mentor, Earth Advocate and Voice of the Plants. She is the Founder of Heart Springs Sanctuary, where she helps people deepen their connection with nature through plant communication. With over 20 years of experience with plant essences, energy work, and herbal practices her private consultations and plant-based protocols are known for helping clients through emotional life transitions, physical health crises, and chronic conditions. Jen has dedicated her life to the spiritual path of plant work. Her apprenticeship certification programs, ceremonies, retreats and workshop offerings are designed for people wanting to open their hearts, fall in love with plants and deepen their relationship to the planet.
Visit www.Brigidsway.com to learn more.

TranscriptsTranscript Jen Frey 

Blog: Finding Our Destiny, Understanding Soul

We have many problems facing us today and our future. Many of us are tired, angry even with the lack of legislative action protecting water, food, air, and soil. It seems we take two steps forward and now we seem to be taking three steps back. Yet, much innovation abounds, often at the grassroots level. We are making a difference.  Yes, more needs to be done. Can we grow stronger more fulfilling communities without gangs, violence, with sustainable food, water, soil, and air resources?

My podcast series, Holistic Nature of Us seeks to be a voice, adding a contribution to our global community following my soul path. Yet how many of us are taught about Soul? We hear Soul referenced in specific work, as a common metaphor but what inner work are we doing to move from intense consumerism which is ego based to one that is ecologically based? Bill Plotkin defines soul as: “a thing’s ultimate place in the world”

My work with dreams, archetypes, the shadow from Carl Jung’s framework has helped me dig deeper into understanding my soul’s path and destiny in ways I could not have imagined. The podcast series was born, following my inner guidance and passion,  I enjoy interviewing, I do a lot of public speaking and so I combined two loves into one venue. I have to tell you I am enjoying the process immensely.

My podcast guest this week, Rebecca Wildbear, river and soul guide works with Bill Plotkin’s Soulcraft program. Bill founded Animas Valley Institute based in Colorado. He reminds me that the post-industrial world is collapsing. What can we contribute to the reinvention of a more healthy culture? He feels we are basically stuck in early adolescence. We need to help each other, get back to more soul-based, mystical work, honoring the natural world once. While this will take time, generations even, we, as part of this masterful world have our own unique contribution to offer. What’s yours? I offer this video to give you an overview of his timely perspective.

For me, this is exciting work. I have been a dreamer all my life and can only tell you how much I have grown doing the deep inner work. I have been privileged to partake in ceremony, deep rituals that have given profound meaning to what I do, who I strive to be, and what fosters my contributions.

What does soul mean to you? What inspired you about Bill’s message?

Have you discovered what makes you sing? get up and go to work from gratitude and joy? Dance with family and friends? What gift do you feel you are bringing to your community?  What do you think about Bill’s SoulCraft message?

I enjoy your comments, your stories. Please share. Thanks.

Enjoy. Judith

 

Holistic Nature of Us: Rebecca Wildbear from Animas Valley Institute



Rebecca Wildbear is a river and soul guide, compassionately helping people tune in to the mysteries that live within the wild Earth community, the Dreamtime, and their own wild nature.

This podcast takes a different approach to sustainability. It ‘s about how we sustain ourselves through the journey of life that can detract us from finding the “soul ” of things, for our growth and happiness. Rebecca leads journeys into the wilderness, allowing us to spend time in nature to reconnect on deeper levels. After all, we are so alike, made from earth, air, water, and fire. We need the Earth and she needs us to awaken again to her gifts, her presence, her majesty.

Check out this episode!

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Rebecca Wildbear, River and soul Guide

Description: Rebecca Wildbear is a river and soul guide, compassionately helping people tune in to the mysteries that live within the wild Earth community, the Dreamtime, and their own wild nature. This podcast takes a different approach to sustainability. It ‘s about how we sustain ourselves through the journey of life that can detract us from finding the “soul ” of things, for our growth and happiness. Rebecca leads journeys into the wilderness, allowing us to spend time in nature to reconnect on deeper levels. After all, we are so alike, made from earth, air, water, and fire. We need the Earth and she needs us to awaken again to her gifts, her presence, her majesty.

About my Guest: A nature-based river and soul guide, Rebecca guides Wild Yoga and Animas Valley Institute programs. She supports people in tuning into the mysteries that live within the animate natural world, dreams, and their own body and deep imagination. Rebecca supports people in discovering their soul’s deepest longing and living a life of creative service while rediscovering their deep belonging within the Earth community. Rebecca is the creator of Wild Yoga™, a sacred way of breathing and moving, aligned with Earth and Soul. For more about Rebecca, visit www.rebeccawildbear.com

Transcript Rebecca Wildbear 

Blog: Arbor Day: Trees: Our Allies, Our Partners, Our Hope

 

 

“To exist as a nation, to prosper as a state, and to live as a people, we must have trees.” Theodore Roosevelt

 

 

 

 

 

Trees, tall and majestic, as a species, are profoundly connected to us. We value their wood for fire, warmth, cooking and creating tools, cooking implements, crafts. We use their leaves, barks, fruits, and roots for food and medicine. They provide shade in the summer, reducing cooling costs. They break the winds from the north providing protection from the cold. They offer habitat to diverse species.

My podcast guest this week, Dana Karcher, Program Manager for the ADF Alliance for Community Trees, says tree science is relatively new. I’ve been reading, The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben from Germany. His research and others are beginning to show how holism principles apply to the forest, though many indigenous cultures knew/know this. Science is catching up.

Let’s look at the concept of holism: it is defined as: “the theory that the parts of any whole cannot exist and cannot be understood except in relation to the whole.”

Scientists are discovering that members of the forest are interconnected. What happens to one can affect the whole. If one part is weak, then through an intricate underground network, messages are sent, received with help on the way. Fungi connect the dots and seem to help by receiving chemical signals through their networks that are connected to root tips. Fungi seem to be mediators, too seeking to distribute information and resources equally. The well being of our forests depends on their community. Isolated trees can actually lose their biodiversity and disappear. Therefore we can no longer go in with our machines, look for the best trees, cut them down often injuring others anymore. All parts are connected. Irresponsible logging destroys ecosystems which can take several years to recover if that is even possible.

” ..a tree is not by itself a forest. Together they actually create an ecosystem that can moderate extremes in temperature and generate humidity.” ( The Hidden Life of Trees, by Peter Wohlleben.) And its complexity is just beginning to be understood.

I saw trees near where I lived completely cut down for apartment development. A beautiful rolling hill was grazed of its trees, many of which were oaks. Oaks alone support over 500 species, versus a Bradford Pear which has now become invasive and supports little wildlife. Our insects need homes, and if we continue to take habitat away, then we see declines and even extinction up the food chain.  What are the implications then of removing trees for development?

First, trees give us oxygen.  “One acre of forest absorbs six tons of carbon dioxide and puts out four tons of oxygen. This is enough to meet the annual needs of 18 people.” U.S. Department of Agriculture

Second, they help retain rainwater. When removed from our landscapes we see an increase in stormwater. Stormwater collects all manner of garbage and pollutants which end up in our waterways. “The planting of trees means improved water quality, resulting in less runoff and erosion. This allows more recharging of the groundwater supply. Wooded areas help prevent the transport of sediment and chemicals into streams.” USDA Forest Service

Third, trees improve our health and add economic value to a property. “Healthy, mature trees add an average of 10 percent to a property’s value.” USDA Forest Service

HoliHo / Pixabay

 

Fourth, trees help keep carbon in the soil.  With development like I mentioned above, acres of trees were removed and the soil dug up for housing development. This act alone sends carbon into the atmosphere and contributes to global warming. “There are about 60– to 200-million spaces along our city streets where trees could be planted. This translates to the potential to absorb 33 million more tons of CO2 every year and saving $4 billion in energy costs. National Wildlife Federation

 

Trees are a part of our world and therefore a part of us. They create intricate ecosystems that I hope will be valued again.

Please plant a tree and if you cannot, support the wonderful work that the Arbor Day Foundation, ADF, offers around our world. If you live in communities with rules, find out which ones support habitat and diversity and if they don’t, get involved and change them. ADF’s Alliance for Community Trees helps individuals and communities replant.

What stories do you have about adding diversity to your landscapes? Have you been able to make a difference in your community? I would enjoy hearing your stories.

Enjoy. Judith

 

 

Podcast: Dana Karcher: Alliance for Community Trees

Description: Trees need us, we need them. The Arbor Day Foundation’s, Alliance for Community Trees, helps community tree planting efforts through funding, fostering connections between groups and support. Because 90% of American live and work in towns and metropolitan areas, the need for local action is greater than ever. The Alliance for Community Trees helps those areas affected by natural disasters to replant trees: what’s best after a flood, a hurricane. Meet Dana Karcher, Program Director, for this grassroots program, advocate for trees.

About My Guest: Dana Karcher is a program manager with the Arbor Day Foundation in Lincoln, Nebraska. She works with community planting and advocacy groups across the United States assisting in building their capacity, networking, and providing resources for their success. Dana’s had an 18-year career in Community Forestry working with municipalities, nonprofits, utilities and other entities assuring that trees are sustainably used to grow and change cities and towns throughout the country.

Podcast Transcript: Transcript Dana Karcher 

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