The Holistic Nature of Us

All New Podcast from Judith Dreyer!

I’m excited to introduce a new podcast series titled: Holistic Nature of us.
My intent is to take us, you and I, into a better understanding of the concepts behind our holistic nature and how that ties directly to the holistic nature of the world around us. How can we connect the dots in practical ways that we are nature and nature’s in us?

Join me for a lineup of inspiring speakers passionate about our earth and our self, They offer practical tips for practical action in easy-to-listen format, 30 minutes.

How are you changing the world? All comments and tips appreciated.

 

 

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Nate Liebenberg, Co-Founder: idiveblue.com

Description: Oceans are mysterious and deep. So many species color these waters that we scarcely see unless one takes to scuba diving. Then the panorama of life unfolds and it’s breathtaking.
I am a certified scuba diver. When one plunges into the depths of any ocean especially near reefs, colors and textures explode. Undulating waters speak of tides and cycles, of mysteries and treasures. However, our oceans are precious. They are taking a beating from dumping our garbage within her waters without thought to the long term consequences. My guest this week, Nate Liebenberg, co-founder of idiveblue.com, is passionate about bringing awareness to the problems we have created with throwaway plastics. They harm so many ocean species. They pollute these precious waters. And ultimately they harm us. 
Join us for a deep blue discussion about our oceans and what we can do to be part of the solutions.
Contact information: www.idiveblue.com
email: [email protected]

About My Guest: Nate is an ocean fanatic, who co-founded iDiveblue.com along with his brother Bill in2018. Nate previously worked in financial modeling for a medical group and at a genetics and bioscience company, before deciding to pursue his dream of running his marine
conservation and watersport business full-time in 2019. Although his business is centered around our beautiful oceans, Nate has a postgraduate degree in financial analysis and portfolio management from the University of Cape Town and is in the process of completing his Chartered Financial Analyst Certification. As the Brothers of iDiveblue.com, Nate and Bill are a couple of South Africans who have scuba dived, swum, snorkeled, sailed, skied, surfed, supped, freediving, fished, kayaked, canoed,
jet skied, kite surfed, body surfed and boated all around the world. They all hold several marine certifications across these activities including skipper licenses, PADI certifications, and more. They consider themselves waterborne and as such, they’ve made it their mission to help preserve our oceans and waterways. They take this on zealously. As such, iDiveblue.com provides community, work, and resources to t

Transcript: Nate Liebenberg 

https://idiveblue.com/ocean-plastics-environmental-disaster/

 

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Ayana Young

Description: Ayana Young is deeply concerned about environmental issues, including social justice, ecology, and land-based restoration. She has been the force behind a native species nursery and research center, including the establishment of the 1 Million Redwoods Project, and the film when When Old Growth Ends. Ayana is a podcast host on “For the Wild,” a weekly show featuring thought-leaders at the forefront of an environmental, artistic, scientific, political, and cultural shift.
Join us for discussions about her projects and how nature is teaching her and her team to have patience, slow down, and immerse within the community of plants.

About My Guest: Ayana Young is a podcast and radio personality specializing in intersectional environmental and social justice, deep ecology, and land-based restoration. With an academic background at the intersections of ecology, culture, and spirituality, Young was studying at Columbia when the Occupy Wall Street movement began and amid the burgeoning resistance in Zuccotti Park, she co-created the Environmental Working Group. Since then Ayana has been the force behind a native species nursery and research center, including the establishment of the 1 Million Redwoods Project, which was acclaimed as the most-backed farm project in Kickstarter history, the film When Old Growth Endsan ode to the complex interweaving of the irreplaceable Tongass National Forest during its last stand as a distinctly wild place in Southeast Alaska and the For The Wild podcast a weekly show featuring thought-leaders at the forefront of an environmental, artistic, scientific, political and cultural shift.

Transcript: Ayana Young 

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Bettylou Sandy, Edible Landscape Ideas

Description: What grows in your yard, naturally? Where does the sunshine, and where does the wind blow in? My podcast guest this week, Bettylou Sandy, reminds us to get to know our land spaces in as much detail as we can. Plants that are naturally present tell us about the condition of the soil. What food sources can you place in the landscape? She says: “Observation is the key for the best results.” Bettylou gives us many practical tips for adding edibles to our landscape.  Have fun, explore, and experiment. Spring is here. We’re raking, cleaning garden beds and planting cold crops before things heat up. Tune in for many practical how to’s and tips.

About My Guest: Bettylou Sandy is an organic garden educator and consultant. She oversees the Spruce Street Community Garden and plays a major role at the Cheney House in Manchester Ct. And she has private clients.

Transcript: Bettylou Sandy 

 

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Dr. Stephanie Seneff, Senior Research Scientist at MIT

Description: My podcast guest, Dr. Stephanie Seneff, a senior research scientist at MIT, has devoted twelve years to trying to understand the role of toxic chemicals in the deterioration of human health. She has devoted efforts to understanding what has been skyrocketing autism rates in the US and around the world. When COVID-19 pandemic began she considered whether glyphosate (the active ingredient in Roundup) might play a role.

Join us for an engaging look at her research and how pesticide use is playing a role in our health.

About My Guest: Stephanie Seneff is a Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She received a B.S. degree in Biophysics in 1968, the M.S. and E.E. degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1980, and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 1985, all from MIT. For over three decades, her research interests have always been at the intersection of biology and computation: developing a computational model for the human auditory system, understanding human language so as to develop algorithms and systems for human-computer interactions, as well as applying natural language processing (NLP) techniques to gene predictions. She has published over 170 refereed articles on these subjects and has been invited to give keynote speeches at several international conferences. She has also supervised numerous Masters and Ph.D. thesis at MIT. In 2012, Dr. Seneff was elected Fellow of the International Speech and Communication Association (ISCA).

In recent years, Dr. Seneff has focused her research interests back towards biology. She is concentrating mainly on the relationship between nutrition and health. Since 2011, she has published over two dozen papers in various medical and health-related journals on topics such as modern-day diseases (e.g., Alzheimer, autism, cardiovascular diseases), analysis and search of databases of drug side effects using NLP techniques, and the impact of nutritional deficiencies and environmental toxins on human health.

Transcript: Dr. Stephanie Seneff 

Dr. Seneff’s published article: Connecting the Dots: Glyphosate and COVID-19

Blog: Creating a Food Forest Patch in Our Yards

 

 

How would you like to have a food forest patch in your yard? Maybe dedicate an 8×8′ square bit of land, ideally removing some lawn? Imagine adding small fruits, food, medicinal plants right in your own back yard? One of the basic tenets of permaculture is to create a ‘food forest patch’ in our yards. What is that and how can I plan a ‘forest patch’ with food in my own yard?

When I hear the word forest I think of trees, lots of them, maybe pine needles and old leaves on paths. Understory trees and shrubs fill in that landscape sometimes making the area appear dense with foliage. Other times these lower story plants line a pathway. How can I mimic this system on a smaller scale in my front or back yard and include food?

My podcast guest this week, Micheal Judd, talked about creating a ‘food forest patch’ in our yards. Before I describe what he suggested I would like to remind all of us about the importance of our forests from a permaculture perspective. Let’s look at some facts:

“Forests are life ( from permaculture news)

  • Forests are home to approximately 50-90% of all the world’s terrestrial (land-living) biodiversity — including the pollinators and wild relatives of many agricultural crops (Source: WWF Living Planet Report 2010)
  • Tropical forests alone are estimated to contain between 10-50 million species – over 50% of species on the planet.
  • Rainforests cover 2% of the Earth’s surface and 6% of its landmass, yet they are home to over half of the world’s plant and animal species.

From these basic facts, it should be evident that forests themselves are synonymous with life, biodiversity, and fertility. Where life gathers, complex and mutually beneficial relationships are created between organisms; natural harmonious communities form, and life forms multiply and proliferate.”

Forests are the best of life and offer ways for us to live in harmony. They provide food and are great examples of how species work together. Yet, we continue to tear down our forests for the sake of development, our thirst for lumber and other byproducts made from trees, and the need for fields for mass monotype agriculture and farming.

Michael suggested that we take (where possible) a small patch maybe 8′ by 8′ and plant a fruit tree. He includes nitrogen-fixing plants such as lupines, blue indigo in the same area. Add other perennials to the mix all planted within this 8×8″ space. Spreading mints can be added too. I had the chance to visit and be on one of his yard tours in MD.  Mints were all over the place but didn’t give me the feeling of taking over. He chops and lets the plant material drop. Very easy and very cool.

As you cut back these companion plants, you leave the plant material right there which continues to build mulch. All of this adds beauty and diversity to your landscape. Check out pawpaw, juneberry, black currants, Aronia’s.  Aronia or chokecherries are native to our continent.  There is much to choose from.

Summary:

Dedicate an 8 x8′ patch for new plants.

Add 8″ compost, layering the materials and leave over winter.

In the spring: Select a fruit-bearing tree appropriate to your region.

Add leguminous plants when you plant the tree; lupines, peas. Around the outer edges add more plants.

Michaels’ book shown above has great detailed ‘how to’s’ and photographs to illustrate his ‘food forest patch’. I highly recommend his book. I personally refer to his ideas over and over. Think about the gardeners in your life. This book is a great addition to any gardener’s library.

So, what would you do? Can you take away some lawn and create a’ food forest patch’? Let me know if you do. All comments are appreciated. Enjoy. Judith

 

 

 

 

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Michael Judd, Edible Landscaping

Description: I love folks who make the best use of their land spaces, incorporating trees, shrubs, flowers that increase habitat, and also food. My guest this week is one fantastic gardener who does just that. Michael Judd is the author of Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist: How to have a yard and eat it too. Join us for an engaging and practical discussion about creating mulch, adding small fruit trees, plant diversity, and more.

About My guest: Michael Judd, the author of Edible Landscaping with a Permaculture Twist, has worked with agro-ecological and whole-system designs throughout the Americas for nearly two decades, focusing on applying permaculture and ecological design. His projects increase local food security and community health in both tropical and temperate growing regions. He is the founder of Ecologia, Edible & Ecological Landscape Design, and Project Bona Fide, an international non-profit supporting agro-ecology research.

Transcript: Michael Judd 

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Dr Jean Shinoda Bolen, Psychiatrist, Jungian Analyst, Activist, Author

Description: It’s a privilege to introduce you to Dr. Jean Shinoda Bolen world-renown author, and speaker. Dr. Bolen, a psychiatrist, a Jungian analyst is known for her contributions to our understanding of archetypes, symbolism, and goddesses/gods as well as her activism working for women’s rights globally.
Her book, Like a Tree, How Trees, Women, and Tree People Can Save the Planet began with personal experience, one that led her to discover ‘tree people and tree huggers’. She weaves their stories within the life of trees: how trees contribute to our environment and more importantly to our culture as one of many species living on this planet. Dr. Bolen relates deforestation to the many waves of abuse women still suffer today.
Join us for a deep and timely look at culture, the COVID-19 virus, trees and us.

About My Guest: Jean Shinoda Bolen, M.D., is a psychiatrist, Jungian analyst and an internationally known author and speaker. She is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, a former clinical professor of psychiatry at Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute, University of California Medical Center and a past board member of the Ms. Foundation for Women, the International Transpersonal Association, and the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco. She is the author of thirteen books in over one hundred foreign editions.  She is a NGO Permanent Representative to the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women from the Women’s World Summit Foundation (Geneva), also represents Pathways To Peace, The Millionth Circle, Earthchild Institute, Women’s Perspective, and the International Public Policy Institute. She is in three acclaimed documentaries: the Academy-Award winning anti-nuclear proliferation film “Women – For America, For the World,” the Canadian Film Board’s “Goddess Remembered,” and “Femme: Women Healing the World.

Transcript: Dr.Jean Shinoda Bolen 

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Rev. Br. Mark D’Alessio, Franciscan, Chaplain

Description: This podcast takes a different focus as we deal with COVID – 19 that has hit our planet and our country these past few weeks. We deal with uncertainty, statistics, and isolation as we struggle to handle the implications for our society and the world. Brother Mark’s message is timely. Through the stories of St Francis of Assisi and St Clare, he engages us in a timeless message that our world is Holistic. We are a part of this world, one species interrelated to all species.  I hope you hear St Francis’ message: go do what you came here to do. The time is now.

About My Guest: The Rev. Br. Mark Gregory D’Alessio is a Franciscan friar in the new religious society of the Companions of Francis and Clare. He’s also an interspiritual Christian priest, spiritual director, chaplain, retreat leader, author, and past President and Executive Director of the Psychotherapy & Spirituality Institute, which draws together the inspiration of the church with the wisdom of psychological care.
A graduate of the Guild for Spiritual Guidance, he is now a faculty member and community leader. He’s also a faculty member at All Faiths Seminary International for the training of interfaith ministers.  A long-time seeker and practitioner of spiritual wisdom, he’s initiated into multiple spiritual lineages, both East (Buddhist) and West (Christian); does his best to affirm the Christian Wisdom tradition within a wider inter-spiritual framework; and, looks to God’s science and spiritual heroes (such as Thích Nhat Hanh and Francis and Clare of Assisi) as sources of inspiration and hope.  He’s committed, as a Franciscan,  to serving those who are sidelined and at risk.
Currently, Br. Mark lives on Long Island and serves as a crisis counselor and program coordinator at a shelter for men and women who are homeless and as a chaplain at a residential treatment center and school for children with learning and emotional disabilities. Moving to Long Island, he founded the Franciscan Circle, a progressive, interfaith gathering of clergy and lay people who seek to journey in mind and heart with the witness and wisdom of the Saints of Assisi, Francis, and Clare. The Circle is dedicated to developing leaders for thoughtful social action and spiritual care.
The Long Island Coalition for the Homeless awarded Br. Mark with their “Unsung Hero” Award last year.

Transcript: Brother Mark D’Alessio

 

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Gail Reynolds

Description: Composting is always a great topic for gardeners. Gail Reynolds, the coordinator for the University of Connecticut’s Composting Program, returns to share her tips and insights on what creates good composting practices. She discusses the difference between natural worms versus Asian worms and why they are good or bad for composting lawn and kitchen debris. Join us for an educational discussion on composting.

About My Guest: College and Master of Forest Science degree from Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. In addition, she holds five information security certifications. Gail is a long-time natural resource and Yale alumni volunteer, including Chair of the Haddam Conservation Commission, Officer of the Haddam Land Trust, member of the Lower Connecticut Land Trust Exchange, Haddam Plan of Conservation and Development committee member, Salmon River committee member, Connecticut Botanical Society board member, Executive Board member of the Yale Science and Engineering Association, Yale student mentor, and Yale alumni interviewer of prospective undergraduate students. She is currently the coordinator for UConn Master Composter Program

Transcript:  Gail Reynolds 

Podcast: Holistic Nature of Us: Meet Ed Cleveland, Sound Vibration and Healing

Description: My guest this week, Ed Cleveland, is an expert in the use of gongs, Singing Bowls, and other instruments. He offers private and group sessions that include harmonic sounds with energy work. Join us for an engaging discussion through the science and art of sound as a healing modality. 

About My Guest: Ed Cleveland is the founder and owner of The Ed Cleveland Reiki &Sound Therapy Training Center
located in Hartford, CT. He is an advanced Gong Practitioner, Neuroacoustic Sound Practitioner, Master Reiki Teacher & Holographic Sound Teacher, Medicinal Aromatherapist, as well as a national award-winning Martial Arts Teacher. Ed brings forth three decades of personal education and experience in his private practice and teachings.

Transcript: Ed Cleveland 

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