Podcast: Erika Harrison, President, Board of Directors Biomimicry Institute

Description: The Biomimicry Institue is a non-profit organization that seeks to empower people to create nature-inspired solutions for a healthy planet. This Institute works to create a new generation of sustainability innovators by focusing on education and entrepreneurship through youth education, global design challenges, and AskNature. Erika gives us several examples of innovative designs created through observing and applying functions to our problems. Intrigued? I am. I hope you join us for this provocative and timely discussion. All comments are appreciated!

About My Guest: “Erika is President of the Board of Directors with the Biomimicry Institute – a nonprofit organization empowering people to create nature-inspired solutions for a healthy planet. The Biomimicry Institute works to create a new generation of sustainability innovators by focusing on education and entrepreneurship through youth education, Global Design Challenges, and AskNature. Erika is also principal of EcoTone Advisors – a boutique strategy, coaching, and consulting firm serving leadership teams, executives, and philanthropists creating personal legacies and purpose-driven organizations for the greater good. Erika earned her MA in Communication & Culture and BA in Cultural Anthropology & Environmental Studies. She is certified in applied Knowledge Management and participatory adult education and integrates strategies inspired by nature in her work, life, and play”. Principal, Ecotone Advisors

Transcript:  #24 Erika Harrison

25th Podcast Episode: Judith Dreyer Interview on Beyond50Radio.com with Dan Davis

I cannot believe this is my 25th episode! I began with encouragement, an idea and a love. My friends encouraged me to get my ideas out. My family said its time for a podcast. And, I enjoy the interviewing format. So an idea was born, a plan formed and here I am today so excited to not only share this podcast series with you but my interview on Beyond50Radio. They have a green, environmental track as well as interview folks from all walks of life. They were a joy to work with.

I cannot begin to tell you how satisfying it has been for me to interview. With our ever-growing, expanding and changing technology we can easily get more info out in easy-to-handle bytes based on our personal interests. I have the pleasure and honor of talking to folks deeply passionate about our earth, ones who have offered simple yet timely tips we can use today. I thank you for your time and your sharing.

WikiImages / Pixabay

I, like many of you, are deeply concerned about climate changes that seem to be shifting our ability to adjust. If it’s affecting us, then it affecting every element, blade of grass and species on this beautiful planet, we call home. If we could do one better recycling task today, reuse something today, give gratitude for every breath we take today, we will make a difference. The innovations I see says we are making changes, creating incredible solutions, from the ground up!

I enjoy your comments. And appreciate you sharing these podcasts. I send each of you my heartfelt thanks.

Judith

 

Guest Blog by Janet Verney: 4 Healthy Herbs Help Heal Our Gut

 

 

 

This week’s guest on my podcast series, Holistic Nature of Us, is Janet Verney. I invited Janet to share an idea for supporting a healthy gut. Her photo and topic include herbs that many of us grow, whether on windowsills, in containers or gardens. Easy to use and a delight to harvest especially this time of year, these herbs provide nourishment and extra benefits towards maintaining a healthy gut.

Why is this so important? Our guts play an extremely important role not only in digestion but keeping our immune systems healthy. Think about this: everything we eat and drink comes from the outside world. Our biological system needs to stay healthy. Growing good bacteria in our gut contributes to overall health and vitality and protects us from unwanted negative bacteria, toxins. Enjoy her easy recipe and valuable message.

Did you know that Herbs & Olive Oil are a win-win for your GUT? In this picture, I have fresh rosemary, sage, oregano, and thyme in a glass jar with some organic, extra virgin olive oil.

• Rosemary, Rosmarinus officinalis, supports poor digestion of fats and has some prebiotic properties.

• Sage, Salvia officinalis,  can reduce bloating and abdominal spasms. In olive oil, it can help lower blood sugars.

• Oregano, Origanum majorana, is a powerful antioxidant, is anti-microbial and promotes healthy gut bacteria.

• Thyme, Thymus vulgaris, mixed with olive oil is superior for gut health.

Olive oil is a polyphenol that is known for its anti-inflammatory properties and is believed to help lower LDL, bad cholesterol. So get some high-quality organic olive oil and some fresh herbs and make your own wonderful infused oil for use on salads of all kinds, or over some GF Ancient Harvest pasta with lightly sautéed veggies. Happy Gut, Healthy Life!

By Janet E.Verney, Author, Certified Integrative Nutrition Coach, & Wellness Designer at ROOTS2Wellness.com Janet-Verney-

Always, your comments and support are appreciated. Please share.

Judith

Podcast: Meet Janet Verney: Wellness Designer

Description: Janet Verney shares her journey of seeking a diagnosis from a serious but unsolved lung ailment, undergoing multiple and complicated testing to letting go. It’s not an easy task to find health solutions but Janet’s journey inspires us as she learned about gut health, the detrimental effects of NSAIDS, (non- steroidal,  anti-inflammatory drugs, usually over the counter) and more. She offers practical health tips as she recounts her journey.

About My Guest: Janet Verney is certified in Integrative Health and specializes in Women’s Wellness. As The Wellness Designer, she creates fun and educational programs for women around the world. Janet is passionate about living a rich and full life through delicious food and an abundant lifestyle!

Transcript:  #25 Janet Varney

Blog: What you need to know about Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) TODAY!

 

 

Every species has a role in our natural ecosystems. This week’s guest, Carole Cheah, research entomologist with the University of CT Agricultural Extension Service shares her research findings concerning Eastern Hemlock and its pests that contribute to its demise in our eastern forests.

Eastern Hemlock: Tsuga canadensis is known as “the redwood of the east”. Tall and majestic, it lives quite long. Do not mistake its size for age. Many young appearing saplings can be quite old as they wait for the forest canopy to open and become flooded with sunlight. Then they shoot up, reaching for sunlight as fast as they can. Its ladder like branches provides habitat for many species. As an evergreen, the needled branches provide shelter in winter and keep the forest cool in summer. They like water and are often found by streams and waterways. Many species depend on them. Not just the tree itself but the ecosystem habitat they sustain in our forests.

However, our Hemlocks are beset with two troublesome pests. Today I am sharing a photograph of what the HWA or hemlock woolly adelgid egg mass and elongate hemlock scale look like on hemlock needles. A picture, they say is worth a thousand words. I hope you agree. The bug surrounds itself with its egg mass and it looks like leftover snow on the branches. Or maybe like cotton tufts which make it very easy to spot on branches especially by the tips of branches as they munch on new growth.

For those of you who want more detailed information, especially for the east coast, I recommend this article: http://www.ct.gov/caes/lib/caes/documents/publications/fact_sheets/entomology/hemlock_woolly_adelgid_2014.pdf

What I also learned from Carole is how the weather affects some of our pests. In this instance, a deep New England freeze can actually harm the pest and decrease its numbers. If you want more information, where to purchase the beneficial pest that helps eliminate HWA, contact your State University Agricultural Station or your Master Gardener program also run by the University Ag station.

Hopefully, you are inspired to keep a closer eye on your hemlocks. I know I am. Check them in late winter, early spring.  Lower branches can be removed or rub the egg mass off. Check with your county agricultural station. They may have folks like Carole monitoring the health and status of hemlocks in your geographic area, offer pest control advice and more.

Old and sentient, these trees have been around a long time, provide invaluable habitat, diversity, and integrity to our forests. Our forests are holistic. Droughts or intense rains place stresses on our natural plant populations. Intense research efforts are being made to preserve our precious native species such as the eastern hemlock.

I appreciate your comments. Please share. Thanks.

Enjoy. Judith

Podcast: Carole Cheah, Entomologist, Eastern Hemlock and Wooly Adelgid

Description: Science is probing the deep forest floor and discovering networks of communication, now known as the “wood-wide web.” Today’s guest, Carole Cheah, shares her extensive body of research concerning the Eastern Hemlock Tree and two pests that have severely impacted these trees, wooly adelgid, and elongate scale. These trees, while not a highly sought after timber product, contribute greatly to the forest ecosystem here in NE America including Nova Scotia. It’s part of a holistic system that when one species suffers many suffer. Join us for an informative discussion.

About My Guest: Dr. Carole Cheah is a durational research entomologist at the Valley Laboratory, the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station in Windsor, funded by the US Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture and previously, by the USDA Forest Service.  Educated in England with a doctorate in biological control and Masters in Applied Entomology from the University of Cambridge and a B.A. (Hons) in Zoology from the University of Oxford, she has conducted research for the past 24 years into the implementation, assessment and improvement of biological control of hemlock woolly adelgid, a serious introduced pest of the urban landscape and native hemlock forests. Her most recent research is on the long-term effects of climate change on populations of HWA, concentrating on the impacts of severe winters in the Northeast.  She also conducts biological control releases of a weevil for invasive mile-a-minute weed control in collaboration with the University of Connecticut.

Transcript: #23 Carol Cheah 

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