25th Podcast Episode: Judith Dreyer Interview on Beyond50Radio.com with Dan Davis

I cannot believe this is my 25th episode! I began with encouragement, an idea and a love. My friends encouraged me to get my ideas out. My family said its time for a podcast. And, I enjoy the interviewing format. So an idea was born, a plan formed and here I am today so excited to not only share this podcast series with you but my interview on Beyond50Radio. They have a green, environmental track as well as interview folks from all walks of life. They were a joy to work with.

I cannot begin to tell you how satisfying it has been for me to interview. With our ever-growing, expanding and changing technology we can easily get more info out in easy-to-handle bytes based on our personal interests. I have the pleasure and honor of talking to folks deeply passionate about our earth, ones who have offered simple yet timely tips we can use today. I thank you for your time and your sharing.

WikiImages / Pixabay

I, like many of you, are deeply concerned about climate changes that seem to be shifting our ability to adjust. If it’s affecting us, then it affecting every element, blade of grass and species on this beautiful planet, we call home. If we could do one better recycling task today, reuse something today, give gratitude for every breath we take today, we will make a difference. The innovations I see says we are making changes, creating incredible solutions, from the ground up!

I enjoy your comments. And appreciate you sharing these podcasts. I send each of you my heartfelt thanks.

Judith

 

Blog: What you need to know about Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (HWA) TODAY!

 

 

Every species has a role in our natural ecosystems. This week’s guest, Carole Cheah, research entomologist with the University of CT Agricultural Extension Service shares her research findings concerning Eastern Hemlock and its pests that contribute to its demise in our eastern forests.

Eastern Hemlock: Tsuga canadensis is known as “the redwood of the east”. Tall and majestic, it lives quite long. Do not mistake its size for age. Many young appearing saplings can be quite old as they wait for the forest canopy to open and become flooded with sunlight. Then they shoot up, reaching for sunlight as fast as they can. Its ladder like branches provides habitat for many species. As an evergreen, the needled branches provide shelter in winter and keep the forest cool in summer. They like water and are often found by streams and waterways. Many species depend on them. Not just the tree itself but the ecosystem habitat they sustain in our forests.

However, our Hemlocks are beset with two troublesome pests. Today I am sharing a photograph of what the HWA or hemlock woolly adelgid egg mass and elongate hemlock scale look like on hemlock needles. A picture, they say is worth a thousand words. I hope you agree. The bug surrounds itself with its egg mass and it looks like leftover snow on the branches. Or maybe like cotton tufts which make it very easy to spot on branches especially by the tips of branches as they munch on new growth.

For those of you who want more detailed information, especially for the east coast, I recommend this article: http://www.ct.gov/caes/lib/caes/documents/publications/fact_sheets/entomology/hemlock_woolly_adelgid_2014.pdf

What I also learned from Carole is how the weather affects some of our pests. In this instance, a deep New England freeze can actually harm the pest and decrease its numbers. If you want more information, where to purchase the beneficial pest that helps eliminate HWA, contact your State University Agricultural Station or your Master Gardener program also run by the University Ag station.

Hopefully, you are inspired to keep a closer eye on your hemlocks. I know I am. Check them in late winter, early spring.  Lower branches can be removed or rub the egg mass off. Check with your county agricultural station. They may have folks like Carole monitoring the health and status of hemlocks in your geographic area, offer pest control advice and more.

Old and sentient, these trees have been around a long time, provide invaluable habitat, diversity, and integrity to our forests. Our forests are holistic. Droughts or intense rains place stresses on our natural plant populations. Intense research efforts are being made to preserve our precious native species such as the eastern hemlock.

I appreciate your comments. Please share. Thanks.

Enjoy. Judith

Podcast: Carole Cheah, Entomologist, Eastern Hemlock and Wooly Adelgid

Description: Science is probing the deep forest floor and discovering networks of communication, now known as the “wood-wide web.” Today’s guest, Carole Cheah, shares her extensive body of research concerning the Eastern Hemlock Tree and two pests that have severely impacted these trees, wooly adelgid, and elongate scale. These trees, while not a highly sought after timber product, contribute greatly to the forest ecosystem here in NE America including Nova Scotia. It’s part of a holistic system that when one species suffers many suffer. Join us for an informative discussion.

About My Guest: Dr. Carole Cheah is a durational research entomologist at the Valley Laboratory, the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station in Windsor, funded by the US Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture and previously, by the USDA Forest Service.  Educated in England with a doctorate in biological control and Masters in Applied Entomology from the University of Cambridge and a B.A. (Hons) in Zoology from the University of Oxford, she has conducted research for the past 24 years into the implementation, assessment and improvement of biological control of hemlock woolly adelgid, a serious introduced pest of the urban landscape and native hemlock forests. Her most recent research is on the long-term effects of climate change on populations of HWA, concentrating on the impacts of severe winters in the Northeast.  She also conducts biological control releases of a weevil for invasive mile-a-minute weed control in collaboration with the University of Connecticut.

Transcript: #23 Carol Cheah 

Blog: Food Sovereignty

 

Food, that which nourishes us and sustains us, has been compromised. Yet, food is a complex topic, one that includes agriculture and large farming methods, food safety, food security, organics, pest management, soil health, water usage and more.

My podcast guest this week, Rachel Sayet, is a member of two food sovereignty groups. As I delved into this tipoic, I realized that food security is often intertwined with food sovereignty yet they have a different focus. What’s the difference between food sovereignty and food security? A lot.

Food security does not distinguish where food comes from, or the conditions under which it is produced and distributed. National food security targets are often met by sourcing food produced under environmentally destructive and exploitative conditions, and supported by subsidies and policies that destroy local food producers but benefit agribusiness corporations.”

Food sovereignty emphasizes ecologically appropriate production, distribution and consumption,
social-economic justice and local food systems as ways to tackle hunger and poverty and
guarantee sustainable food security for all peoples. It advocates trade and investment that serve
the collective aspirations of society. It promotes community control of productive resources;
agrarian reform and tenure security for small-scale producers; agro-ecology; biodiversity; local
knowledge; the rights of peasants, women, indigenous peoples and workers; social protection and climate justice.”

According to The Six Pillars of Food Sovereignty, developed at Nyéléni, 2007 (Food Secure Canada,
2012), food sovereignty is defined by these parameters:

1. Focuses on food for the people by: a) placing people’s need for food at the centre of policies;
and b) insisting that food is more than just a commodity.
2. Values food providers by: a) supporting sustainable livelihoods; and b) respecting the work of
all food providers.
3. Localizes food systems by: a) reducing the distance between suppliers and consumers; b)
rejecting dumping and inappropriate food aid; and c) resisting dependence on remote and
unaccountable corporations.
4. Places control at a local level by: a) placing control in the hands of local food suppliers; b)
recognizing the need to inhabit and share territories; and c) rejecting the privatization of natural
resources.
5. Promotes knowledge and skills by: a) building on traditional knowledge; b) using research to
support and pass on this knowledge to future generations; and c) rejecting technologies that
undermine local food systems.
6. Works with nature by: a) maximizing the contributions of ecosystems; b) improving resilience;
and c) rejecting energy intensive, monocultural, industrialized and destructive production methods.

The Food Sovereignty Alliance website provides detailed information about legislation, events, resources for thoughtful action.

I don’t know about you but I choose organic food grown with sustainable practices that ensure nutritious food, healthy soil, air, and water for future generations. We are slowly turning this planet into one big desert. It’s time for practical action and profound inner change! Please comment and share. Thanks.

Enjoy. Judith

Podcast: Meet Rachel Sayet, Tribal Member Mohegan Tribe

Description: Rachel Sayet, walks her talk as she travels around our country teaching and sharing Native American traditional cooking and culture. She is a member of the Mohegan Tribe here in SW CT and a chef with a background in restaurant management and a Masters Degree in Anthropology. Her teaching experiences are varied as she hopes to bring back more traditional foods along with their rich history of storytelling, music, and calendars. She supports the US Food Sovereignty Alliance and the Native American Food Sovereignty Alliance. Her enthusiasm and energy are inspiring.

About My Guest: Rachel is a Mohegan tribal member from Uncasville, Connecticut. She received her bachelor’s degree in restaurant management from Cornell University. While attending Cornell, Rachel worked in kitchens and took many culinary classes. Upon graduation, Rachel worked as a personal chef in upstate New York. She later went on to receive her master’s in anthropology at Harvard University. Rachel has been working for the Mohegan Cultural Department since 2013. Since then, she has also been researching Native American foods. She has presented her work throughout the country at conferences and classrooms, and has begun food sovereignty initiatives at the Mohegan Tribe; partnering with the health department on gardening events, cooking and storytelling workshops for Mohegan youth, and a native cooking show. Her most recent project is the Native Food Discussion Group, created in order to share knowledge about seasonal eating, harvesting, growing, and fishing practices.

Transcript: #22 Rachel Sayet 

 

Blog: Canticle Farms Community Vision

 

 

 

I am inspired by on the ground, in the dirt, devotion, dedication, and innovation directed towards creating a more collaborative world. And so much is happening as we see and witness one idea, coupled with practical action, take root all around our globe making a difference. Folks, including children, are taking chances, making products, developing innovations that have immediate positive consequences. Isn’t it great?

Father Rohr, the founder of the Center for Action and Contemplation(CAC) in New Mexico, says change happens from the bottom up not the top down.  We know we have problems. We know we not been good stewards of this planet. We know that our conquer and control mentality only feeds the bottom corporate line and fills us with stuff. But many of us, you and I, want something better. We want healthy vibrant seeds free of chemicals and returned to us. We want fresh healthy food grown in healthy vibrant soils. We want our air and water to be clean and pure. We want to feel the vibrancy of nature not just for us but for the next generations. We want a safe world, filled with wonder, beauty. What is our legacy? What will we leave behind? Important questions that I hope inspires you in some way to take action.

My podcast series, Holistic Nature of Us, has enabled me to speak with folks across our country, including Anne Symens-Bucher of Canticle Farms. Canticle Farms is a living, breathing, holistic-based community near troubled areas in East Oakland Cal. She mentioned Johanna Macy, an author who reminds us we are in a time called “the great turning”. She speaks of growing community where everyone: land, species, people, housing, neighbors are respected, valued. The youtube above is short yet timely. We can take down fences, get to know our neighbors again, reach out and help each other today.

Holistic, sustainable, reverent appreciation for all creates a more fulfilling world.

Albert Schweitzer said: ” By having a reverence for life, we enter into a spiritual relation with the world. By practicing reverence for life we become good, deep, and alive.”

Any thoughts, or comments?  I enjoy hearing from you.  You are valued and appreciated. Enjoy. Judith

 

 

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